About

I am a writer based in New York City. My writing and articles have appeared in journals, magazines, and anthologies both in the US and abroad. Here are my unspecific musings about writing, books, translation, etc. Like most people, I’m finishing my first novel.

I curate all of the material on this blog. If you enjoy a book mentioned, please consider purchasing a copy through The Book Depository or Amazon, both offer free shipping, or an independent bookseller. As an Affiliate, proceeds go to the maintenance of acidfreepulp.com.
**Also, unless noted, all work is original and cannot be reproduced without written permission. Citing and linking to original material, however, is permissible. Photographs and other images are either property of the author, which may not be reproduced except with explicit written permission, or are stock images. Non-original images are credited from the original source.**

31 comments

  1. I am so glad that I was led to your blog. I intended to do a quick peruse and check it out more later, but that quickly turned into “read every post.” I so enjoy everything you write! I apologize in advance if I become an over-commentor.

    1. Don’t apologize! I have only had the blog for a month but the comments have been thought provoking and enlightening. I’m very interested to hear other people’s opinions, questions, disagreements and anecdotes. Cheers!

    1. Good luck with the big read! I wish I could read a book a week for pleasure but I’m always under a deadline or such nonsense for book reviews or articles. It’s a pleasure when I get a moment to read a book I have chosen.

      1. Die Leiden des jungen Werther. I always wondered why it’s translated with “sorrows” when the literal translation would be “sufferings” (at least that’s what my German friend keeps telling me). And without giving too much away, I do think “sufferings” would be somewhat more apt. Enjoy the read when you get a spare minute.

      2. In response to enjoylifeconsciously…..

        German is a very direct language and they have so many words and phrases we don’t have but because of their directness they don’t have many synonyms (where we have SO many ways, for example, of saying ‘small’–tiny, little, minute, etc. they just use one–klein/kleine).

        So ‘die lieden,’ which does mean suffering, also can mean sorrows or complaint…. Freud und Lieden : joy and sorrow.

  2. Thank you for visiting my blog, I’ve enjoyed reading yours and would have stayed longer except that I really should do some work. I have a tiny request – would you consider adding rss feed so that those of us who don’t like email following can still keep up to date?

    1. Your wish is my command. There is a RSS button at the top of the sidebar or you can go to acidfreepulp.com/feed to follow.

      p.s. I love Berlin and am planning another trip in the next few months,

  3. I really enjoy your blog. Great perspective and material. Always good to see a translators point of view on writing. It is something that most people never think about.

    A suggestion for your blog. I noticed your legal notes stating how the content of your blog can be used. A very good idea. A good place for some well written legal licensing for just that is the Creative Commons website. It is very helpful and is actually written in a way that a non-lawyer can understand.

    http://creativecommons.org/

    1. Thank you very much for the kind words. I will definitely take a look at Creative Commons. I hope to write more on translation in the near future…I feel that topic got sidetracked for awhile.

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